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Everyone can help recognize a possible concussion if they know what to look for.

A person with a concussion might have any of the signs or symptoms listed below. They might show up right away or hours, or even days later. Just one sign or symptom is enough to suspect a concussion. Most people with a concussion do not lose consciousness.

What to do if you suspect a concussion

Follow these three steps if you — or someone you know — experiences a blow to the head, face, neck or body and you suspect a concussion. Call 911 if you are concerned the injury is life-threatening, such as the person is unconscious or they had a seizure.

  1. Recognize signs and symptoms of a concussion and remove yourself or the athlete from the sport/physical activity, even if you feel OK or they insist they are OK.
  2. Get yourself or the athlete checked out by a physician or nurse practitioner.
  3. Support gradual return to school and sport.

These resources are not intended to provide medical advice relating to health care. For advice on health care for concussion symptoms, please consult with a physician or nurse practitioner.

Common signs and symptoms

Physical

Sleep-related

Cognitive (Thinking)

Emotional

Red Flags

“Red flags” may mean the person has a more serious injury. Treat red flags as an emergency and call 911.

Red flags include:

From Ontario Soccer

Other Resources

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